Racism In India Essay

In spite of friendship and love in private spaces, the Delhi public literally stops and stares. It is harrowing to constantly have children and adults tease, taunt, pick, poke and peer at you from the corner of their eyes, denying their own humanity as well as mine. Their aggressive, crude curiosity threatens to dominate unless disarmed by kindness, or met with equal aggression.

Once I stood gazing at the giraffes at the Lucknow Zoo only to turn and see 50-odd families gawking at me rather than the exhibit. Parents abruptly withdrew infants that inquisitively wandered towards me. I felt like an exotic African creature-cum-spectacle, stirring fear and awe. Even my attempts to beguile the public through simple greetings or smiles are often not reciprocated. Instead, the look of wonder swells as if this were all part of the act and we were all playing our parts.

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Racism is never a personal experience. Racism in India is systematic and independent of the presence of foreigners of any hue. This climate permits and promotes this lawlessness and disdain for dark skin. Most Indian pop icons have light-damn-near-white skin. Several stars even promote skin-bleaching creams that promise to improve one’s popularity and career success. Matrimonial ads boast of fair, v. fair and v. very fair skin alongside foreign visas and advanced university degrees. Moreover, each time I visit one of Delhi’s clubhouses, I notice that I am the darkest person not wearing a work uniform. It’s unfair and ugly.

Discrimination in Delhi surpasses the denial of courtesy. I have been denied visas, apartments, entrance to discos, attentiveness, kindness and the benefit of doubt. Further, the lack of neighbourliness exceeds what locals describe as normal for a capital already known for its coldness.

My partner is white and I am black, facts of which the Indian public reminds us daily. Bank associates have denied me chai, while falling over to please my white friend. Mall shop attendants have denied me attentiveness, while mobbing my partner. Who knows what else is more quietly denied?

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"An African has come," a guard announced over the intercom as I showed up. Whites are afforded the luxury of their own names, but this careful attention to my presence was not new. ATM guards stand and salute my white friend, while one guard actually asked me why I had come to the bank machine as if I might have said that I was taking over his shift.

It is shocking that people wear liberalism as a sign of modernity, yet revert to ultraconservatism when actually faced with difference. Cyberbullies have threatened my life on my YouTube videos that capture local gawking and eve-teasing. I was even fired from an international school for talking about homosociality in Africa on YouTube, and addressing a class about homophobia against kids after a student called me a ‘fag’.

Outside of specific anchors of discourse such as Reservations, there is no consensus that discrimination is a redeemable social ill. This is the real issue with discrimination in India: her own citizens suffer and we are only encouraged to ignore situations that make us all feel powerless. Be it the mute-witnesses seeing racial difference for the first time, kids learning racism from their folks, or the blacks and northeasterners who feel victimised by the public, few operate from a position that believes in change.

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Living in India was a childhood dream that deepened with my growing understanding of India and America’s unique, shared history of non-violent revolution. Yet, in most nations, the path of ending gender, race and class discrimination is unpaved. In India, this path is still rural and rocky as if this nation has not decided the road even worthy. It is a footpath that we are left to tread individually.

 


(The writer is a Black American PhD student at the Delhi School of Economics.)

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Racism
Have you ever been picked on or made fun of because your nationality is different from someone else’s or the color of your skin? If so, then the person who did it was probably a racist person. Racism still exists within all cultures. Some people won’t admit they’re a racist, but their actions and words prove otherwise. Most people won’t directly discriminate other races, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen everyday.
Many will argue that their race is superior over another, or that the actions of a few individuals of a certain race determines how that race of people are, therefore making them unequal. I think all people should be treated equally, no matter who they are or what they look like.
The reason why I know racism…show more content…

However, there is no rights to govern how one person might perceive another person so every one can think or act on how they treat members of another race. Who’s to say that if one group of people believes that they are superior over another group, that they won’t display those actions if they confronted by members of that group or race? Prejudice people think that their way is right and they have the freedom of speech to express how they feel. If you were to ask if they were racist, they would defend their actions by saying it is how it should be and it isn’t wrong.
Racism is broad topic to talk about but once everyone realizes it exists in the U.S. they can take steps to trying to talk to their children about it and maybe even change some of their ways in knowing that racism is wrong. It may not exist where you live, but any place that there will be adults, teens, or children of different races interact together there is a possibility of prejudice.
Many other cultures are a target for racism, it isn’t just black and white. Japanese, Indian, and Germans aren’t safe from racism. I witnessed all kinds of prejudice against a wide variety of races. I’ve seen other races mistreat whites, blacks, and even Asians.
Basically, racism affects us all. I don’t think it will go away ever because here in America there is such a wide variety of races, and when they are all mixed together, in the neighborhoods, the schools, the workplace, and churches, there is bound to be

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