1500 Word Essay References

Word limits and assignment length

Assignment length requirements are usually given in terms of numbers of words.

Unless the lecturer tells you that these limits are strict, it is normally acceptable to be 10% above or below this word limit (so, for example, a 2000 word assignment should be between 1800 and 2200 words). If the assignment uses the words “up to” (as in “up to 2500 words”) that usually means that you cannot go above the limit.

Use the tool below to calculate the acceptable range for an assignment (based on +/- 10%).

Unless the lecturer tells you otherwise, the word limit does not include ‘administrative’ sections of the assignment: the cover or title page, table of contents, table of figures, reference list, list of works cited, bibliography, or any appendices.

The word limit that you are given reflects the level of detail required. This means that if your assignment is too long, you're either taking too many words to explain your point or giving too many / too detailed examples. If your assignment is too short, either there is more to the answer than you have written or the assignment has not gone into enough detail about the answer.

Too long

  • Don't try to remove single words from your assignment. It is unlikely to reduce the assignment's length significantly, but it may confuse your argument. Instead, aim to remove or condense whole sections of your assignment.
  • You should not include something just because it is a fact, or just because it is included in your course materials. Include something only if it is relevant to your argument.
  • Be direct. State your point rather than writing many paragraphs to ‘lead up’ to it.
  • Go back to the question. Which sections relate to the point and which are secondary?
  • Go back to the plan. Which paragraphs fit in the overall structure? Which paragraphs overlap and can be combined?
  • Remove sections where you
    • Over-explain your point
    • Over-specify your point
    • Repeat yourself
    • Write off-topic or ramble
  • Remove multiple examples where one or two are sufficient.
  • Remove ‘hedging” language that adds little to the argument, e.g. “I think that” “it would seem that” “it is possible that”

If you are often over the word count you should look at your writing style. See writing concisely for more.

Too short

Explain your argument fully

  • Make sure every argument in your head and in your plan is on the page.
  • Would a general (i.e. non-specialist) reader understand your point? Have someone else read over your assignment and ask you questions about it. What do they think is missing?
  • Are there gaps in your argument?
  • Does each point logically follow the last one, or do you jump over important points?

Look for the ‘hidden’ answer

  • What theories do you think the marker expects?
  • How does this relate to the materials from lectures and study guides? Use the course information in your answer to the assignment question.
  • Are there complications or contradictions in the argument or in your research? Explain them and explore them.

Flesh it out

  • Define any special terminology you've used that a general reader would not be familiar with.
  • Illustrate with more examples and/or quotations.
  • Contextualise and explain the quotations you use. How do they relate to your argument?

Page authorised by Director, CTL
Last updated on 25 October, 2012

Essay referencing can be a headache at university. How many references do you need? When should you use a reference? Should you use references even when you haven't used a direct quotation? How many references are too many? By knowing how to reference properly, you can reduce the stress involved in your essay writing.

To help make essay referencing easier, we've tackled a few of those niggling questions that should make the process a little smoother.

Why does referencing matter?

Including references in your essay is your way to show your markers that you've truly engaged with your subject matter. It is also important as it proves that you've read the key sources which relate to your topic. They additionally show that you've thought carefully about how each source relates to the subject you're writing about. The more helpful references you include, the more well-informed you appear to be about your topic. It’s not always about quantity, either. Quality sources which really inform your essay are really worth including.

Including a bibliography is good academic practice. If you go on to study further, write more about your subject or publish your work, giving kudos to the writers whose work you took information and inspiration from is essential. A bibliography also provides a helpful resource you can go back to and use for future work.

How many references is too many references?

Of course, it is possible to use too many references. If you are using references just to show off all the books you've read, this will be obvious and will not impress your markers. You need to choose the sources which really contribute to your essay; supporting your argument, contesting it or prompting interesting, relevant questions.

Remember, markers also want to see evidence of your own, original thinking. Using too many references does not leave much room for your personal standpoint to shine through. As a general rule, you should aim to use one to three, to support each key point you make. This of course depends on subject matter and the point you are discussing, but acts as a good general guide.
It can be useful to have a best practice breakdown of your essay to help you work out how many references to use. Here's a rough guide to help you get the balance right for any piece of academic work:

Introduction

  • Your introduction should make up approximately 10% of your essay. You may want to use one or two references to define your topic in this section, depending on your word count.

Body

  • The main body of your essay (which will include the key points in your argument) should make up approximately 75% of your essay. For example: In a 2000 word essay, you will have 1500 words to use. Each main point you make should typically use 1-3 paragraphs, which should average around 200-400 words in total. This will give you room for around 5 key points, each supported by 2 or 3 references. Try and use direct or primary references where possible. Sometimes you’ll need to use in-text references, too.

Conclusion

  • Your conclusion should account for around 15% of your essay. You may wish to use 1-3 references to lend authority to your concluding statements. Of course, it is really hard to suggest exactly how many references your essay should include. This depends totally on the subject matter and word count. A Philosophy essay, for example, may have a lot of critical thinking and be quite theory-heavy, and for this reason you may need more references than a typical English Literature Essay. This is just an example – you’ll need to consider your own subject matter and topic.

When to use references

References aren't just used to give credit for quotations. They can be used to indicate that an idea, concept, fact or theory has come directly from a particular reference. Other instances when references must be used include:

  • Quotes
  • Diagrams
  • Illustrations
  • Charts
  • Pictures

And if you've used any information or ideas from:

  • Websites
  • Books
  • Magazines
  • Essays
  • Newspapers
  • Interviews
  • Television
  • Radio
  • Movies
  • Music
  • Computer programmes
  • Any external source

Stuck with referencing your essay?

At Oxbridge Essays we've written thousands of academically referenced essays. We can work with your course's exact reading materials, or undertake our own research to help you create a perfectly referenced essay with the right amount of references, formatted using your university's chosen system.

Get in touch today to find out how we can help you

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