Essay On Chronic Bronchitis

Bronchitis

  • Length: 338 words (1 double-spaced pages)
  • Rating: Excellent
Open Document

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - More ↓
Bronchitis is an
INFLAMMATION of the membrane that lines
the air passages, or, bronchial tubes, of the
LUNGS and results in the narrowing of these air
passages. This disorder may be of either an acute
or chronic type. Irritation of mucus-producing
glands within the membrane results in the
production of excess bronchial secretions. The
main symptoms of bronchitis are cough and
increased expectoration of sputum, with or without
associated wheezing and shortness of breath.
Acute bronchitis is usually caused by infection by
one of the many viruses that cause the common
COLD or INFLUENZA and is frequently
associated with MEASLES. The patient may
suffer from additional symptoms, such as chest
discomfort, fever, and aching, that are
characteristic of these diseases. WHOOPING
COUGH is a form of severe bronchitis caused by
the bacterium Hemophilus pertussis. Treatment of
a pure viral infection is directed toward the relief
of symptoms, but frequently secondary infections
by bacteria complicate the condition. In such a
case the patient's sputum may turn from white to
yellow (purulent, or pus containing), and treatment
with various antibiotics is recommended. Acute
chemical bronchitis may be caused by the
inhalation of irritating fumes, such as smoke,
chlorine, ammonia, and ozone. Chronic bronchitis
results from prolonged irritation of the bronchial
membrane, causing cough and the excessive
secretion of mucus for extended periods. By far
the most common cause of chronic bronchitis is
cigarette SMOKING, but air pollution and
industrial fume and dust inhalation are also
important irritants. Patients with chronic bronchitis
are subject to recurrent infections with H.
influenzae and pneumococci. Pulmonary
EMPHYSEMA often coexists, and over a long
period of time the patient may suffer from

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Bronchitis." 123HelpMe.com. 11 Mar 2018
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=56473>.

LengthColor Rating 
Bronchitis Essay - Bronchitis is an INFLAMMATION of the membrane that lines the air passages, or, bronchial tubes, of the LUNGS and results in the narrowing of these air passages. This disorder may be of either an acute or chronic type. Irritation of mucus-producing glands within the membrane results in the production of excess bronchial secretions. The main symptoms of bronchitis are cough and increased expectoration of sputum, with or without associated wheezing and shortness of breath. Acute bronchitis is usually caused by infection by one of the many viruses that cause the common COLD or INFLUENZA and is frequently associated with MEASLES....   [tags: essays research papers fc]338 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays[preview]
Case Study of a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Essay example - The presented case is of a patient named R.S. who has a smoking history of many years, which can be directly tied to his development of chronic bronchitis, a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specified as Type B. It is estimated that in 90% of chronic bronchitis or “blue bloaters”, cigarette smoking is the major cause. Chronic bronchitis involves persistent and irreversible airway obstruction, due to the constant inflammation of the bronchial mucosa, leading to hypertrophy and hyperplasia of bronchial glands....   [tags: cough, bronchitis, bronchodilator]
:: 1 Works Cited
564 words
(1.6 pages)
Strong Essays[preview]
Integrative Case Study in Respiratory Diseases Essay - A 25 year-old male reports a life-long history of upper respiratory tract infections which occur about twice a year. Three weeks ago, he came down with the “flu,” with coughing of yellowish-green and difficult to expectorate sputum, fever and chills, shortness of breath, and slight chest pain. He saw a biomedical physician who diagnosed acute asthmatic bronchitis and prescribed a course of Amoxicillin for 10 days and a metered dose Albuterol inhaler, 2 puffs every 4 hours for a week. He stopped taking the inhaler after 4 days because he seemed to be getting palpitations, nervousness, and sleeplessness from taking it; besides, he was no longer short of breath....   [tags: bronchitis, external cough, internal cough]
:: 7 Works Cited
1735 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays[preview]
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Essay - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 1.2.1 Definitions and Terminology --------------------------- There are no universally accepted terminology or definition for the group of conditions characterised by airways obstruction that is completely reversible (Snider, 1996). There are several problems that have to be considered. The first results from the use of the term ‘chronic obstructive pulmonary diseaseÂ’ (COPD), which is considered inaccurate since this is not truly a disease but a group of diseases....   [tags: Papers]3506 words
(10 pages)
Powerful Essays[preview]
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Essay - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or COPD is an umbrella term used to describe a combination of lung diseases. COPD (in the US) most commonly includes two main diseases, Emphysema and Chronic Bronchitis. COPD is a progressive disease that becomes worse over time. There is no known cure for COPD, but treatments are available to maintain quality of life. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease causes coughing fits that produce large amounts of phlegm as the bronchioles become plugged up with mucus....   [tags: Health, Smoking]
:: 6 Works Cited
1821 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays[preview]
Essay on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Nebulized Furosemide - COPD is noted as being the fourth leading cause of mortality in the United States. Mortality is expected to increase among COPD patients despite advances in its management. As exacerbations and hospitalizations characterize a key driver of the cost and morbidity of COPD, significance should be placed on interventions aimed at delaying the advancement of disease, inhibiting exacerbations, and reducing the risk of co-morbidities. Treatment for COPD has been at of a standstill in recent years. Beta2 antagonists, corticosteroids, and theophylline have been at the helm....   [tags: treatment, mortality, pulmonary irritant]
:: 15 Works Cited
1476 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays[preview]
Essay on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is the result of the obstruction of the airways and of the air out of the lungs as you exhale. Not only is this condition usually permanent with attacks (called exacerbations when the attacks become worse, even life-threatening) occurring over long periods of time (hence the word “chronic” in the name of the condition), it can also become more serious with each attack. COPD is usually caused by three conditions that over time that wreak havoc on the respiratory system....   [tags: Case Study]
:: 3 Works Cited
1785 words
(5.1 pages)
Good Essays[preview]
Teenage Smoking Essay - Teenage Smoking: Teenagers Should Not Smoke      Teenagers should not smoke because smoking is the most preventable cause of death in America today, especially among teenage smokers. Cigarette smoking is the major cause of lung cancer. It is also responsible for chronic bronchitis. Last, there is emphysema, which is another disease caused by smoking. By smoking, people have a fivefold increase in the risk of dying from lung cancer, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema.      Lung cancer accounts for 29 percent of all cancer deaths in the United States and smoking accounts for about 87 percent of lung cancer deaths....   [tags: Cigarette Smoking]395 words
(1.1 pages)
Strong Essays[preview]
Why Smoking is Good for You Essay - Why Smoking is Good for You Smoking is good for in many ways including making you live longer. Although most text books and “experts” say that smoking is bad for you, there are also many other people who disagree and say it has many curing properties. For example, a person with bronchitis from childhood accompanied by marked wheezing wads told by doctors not to smoke. He was then told by an old country doctor that he used to be like him until he took up the pipe. Then he tried smoking and it reduced his bronchitis by far and reduced his cough....   [tags: Papers]442 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays[preview]
The Effects of Smoking Cigarettes Essay - The Effects of Smoking Introduction      Smoking cigarettes damage the body in a number of different ways. Over several years, the American Council on Science and Health and many others have documented the effects of smoking. Everyone knows that it is bad for you, but not many know how it affects the body. There are many myths about smoking, which mainly occur with all of the teens that are smoking. Most teens don’t know that the effects of smoking are mostly permanent. They think that they can smoke for a few years and then quit without suffering any long-term effects....   [tags: Cause Effect Research Cigarettes Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1428 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays[preview]

Related Searches

Chronic         Cigarette Smoking         Tubes         Bacterium         Passages         Characteristic         Chest         Pulmonary         Membrane         Infections        




increasing breathlessness, decreasing exercise
tolerance, and, finally, total disability. In the most
severe forms of the disease, the patient may have
a blue, bloated appearance, and a fatal heart
disease, known as COR PULMONALE.
HOWARD BUECHNER, M.D. Bibliography:
Burrows, B., Respiratory Disorders (1983);
Fletcher, C., et al., The Natural History of
Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema (1976);
Pennington, J. E., ed., Respiratory Infections
(1983).



People must breath in order to live. The process of breathing ("respiration", in medical terminology) is critical because it is the sole mechanism through which vital gasses such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can move between the air and the blood. When someone breaths in, oxygen is removed from the air and dissolved into the blood where it is used as fuel by the body's cells. When someone breaths out, cellular waste products like carbon dioxide are removed from the blood and exhaled back out into the air. This complex transfer of gasses takes place in the lungs and involves a number of structures associated with the lungs that help move gasses between the lungs and the air: the bronchi (airways or passages within the lungs), and the alveoli (tiny air sacs composed of special membranes found at the end of the bronchi at which point the transfer of gases between the blood and the air occurs).

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD for short) occurs when permanent blockages form within the pulmonary system (the term "pulmonary" refers to the lungs and respiratory system) that interfere with the transfer of vital gasses. To be diagnosed with COPD means that some portion of one's bronchi or alveoli have become permanently obstructed, reducing the volume of air that can be handled by the lungs. As this process progresses, the overall efficiency of the gas exchange process is reduced.

There are two underlying disorders that can cause COPD: Emphysema and chronic Bronchitis.

Bronchitis is literally an inflammation of the bronchi. The walls of the bronchi inside the lungs become inflamed, and this inflammation decreases the bronchi's diameter so that less air is able to flow through than normal. The inflammation process promotes excessive production of mucous. Bronchial mucous, which serves to keep the airways clean and free of bacteria, is produced under normal conditions. However, the excessive mucous produced in bronchitis is thicker and more difficult to cough up than normal, and acts to clog the airways and inhibit lung capacity.

Emphysema also reduces the efficiency of the gas exchange process, only in a different manner. Emphysema affects the alveoli, specifically their sensitive membranes through which the gas exchange process occurs. Emphysema causes alveolar membranes to lose elasticity, become brittle, and then actually rip and tear. Broken alveolar membranes cannot be regenerated by the body. Each time alveolar membranes burst, more surface area within the lung necessary for gas transfer is permanently lost. As this process progresses, it becomes very difficult for patients to exhale because their weakened airways threaten collapse the harder they try to breathe out. The heart tries to compensate for the loss of oxygen available in the bloodstream by pumping harder and faster; a process associated with other serious complications including heart failure.

Asthma is another respiratory disease that may be associated with COPD but which is not itself classified as COPD. People who have asthma have highly sensitive bronchi that are more reactive to environmental irritants like smoke, dust and pollen than are the bronchi of people who do not have asthma. During an asthma attack, asthma patients' bronchi swell and narrow in a manner similar to what occurs in bronchitis, restricting the volume of gasses that can be transferred between the blood and the air. At this time, the exact relationship between asthma and COPD is unclear. However, there is some evidence to support the "Dutch Hypothesis" that both asthma and COPD have common genetic origins and may represent different expressions of a similar disease process. The jury is still out on whether the Dutch Hypothesis is accurate or not, but numerous researchers believe that it is at least partially true that asthmatic people may have a heightened genetic vulnerability for COPD.

0 thoughts on “Essay On Chronic Bronchitis

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *